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Music on this week's show:​

Hear the full show (uploaded Mondays): 

LA Times:
David Horsey, "Top of the Ticket"
April 7, 2017
Scott Pruitt undermines the EPA with anti-scientific ignorance ​

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EARTH DAY 2017: MARCH FOR SCIENCE

Guest: Pamela Boyce Simms

"Compared to What"
Les McCann & Eddie Harris

Quoted on the Show: Earth Day, Science, and the Trump Administration

JANUS ADAMS

For this "EARTH DAY" edition of the show, Our guest is resilience strategist and environmental activist, Pamela Boyce Simms.

At its most personal, on the ‘you-and-me-let’s-get-real’ gut level, what does climate change truly mean? And, what’s at stake?

How we adapt to the realities of climate change is key to our survival, says Pamela.  “We have three days food supply in most cities, towns, and hamlets. I’m talking about friends and neighbors figuring out how to be less vulnerable than that.”  With the increase of "natural" disasters, what's at stake is access to food and fresh water.  

In her practice, Pamela Boyce Simms works with the United Nations, the Quaker-led Earthcare Coalition, and the Transition movement to build resilience networks. Creating Afrocentric food production solutions, she develops survival models for the world’s most vulnerable populations. 

More about Pamela Boyce Simms:

Hear the show streamed live Saturdays at 4:00 pm on WJFF Radio Catskill.  Subscribe to our podcast and listen to past shows onSoundCloud.

Tags: Earth Day, March for Science, Climate change, United Nations, Quakers, Earthcare, Transition movement, Pamela Boyce Simms, environment, food, water, WJFF

Earth Day and the March for Science:​

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The New Yorker:
Elizabeth Kolbert 
April 12, 2017
Earth Day in the Age of Trump​

video: "A Melting Glacier" - Glaciologists climb a Himalayan glacier to measure how rapidly it’s melting.
(c) The New Yorker