Apple Pond Farm and Renewable Energy Education Center ​offers tours, classes, workshops, and getaways for adults and families with children.  Chicken-raising, cheese-making, organic gardening, spinning and dyeing, renewable energy, and animal care.  Visit the farm in person,onlineor by phone: (845) 482-4764

"Compared to What"
Les McCann & Eddie Harris

JANUS ADAMS

Willow Wisp Organic Farm grows a diverse mix of vegetables, herbs, and cut flowers.  As certified organic farmers, they use no pesticides, herbicides, or synthetic fertilizers.  Instead, they increase the farm’s biodiversity with cover crops, crop rotation, and creating insect and wildlife habitat.  To find their products at regional farmers markets, retailers, and restaurants, visit them online or phone:  (570) 224-8013

Farmer Amy Erlwein preserves more than cucumbers as pickles, she preserves the art and craft of canning.  To learn about food, agriculture, and how to start your own community garden, check out:   Cornell Cooperative Extension, Sullivan County or phone: (845) 292-6180

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Pamela Boyce Simms: They tried to bury us. They didn't know we were seeds.

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This week on THE JANUS ADAMS SHOW, we draw inspiration from a Mexican proverb: “They tried to bury us. They didn’t know we were seeds.” 

Our guest is resilience strategist and environmental activist, Pamela Boyce Simms.

At its most personal, on the ‘you-and-me-let’s-get-real’ gut level, what does climate change truly mean? And, what’s at stake?

Adapting to the realities of climate change is key, says Pamela.  “We have three days food supply in most cities, towns, and hamlets. I’m talking about friends and neighbors figuring out how to be less vulnerable than that.”  At stake -- with the increase of “natural” disasters -- is access to food and fresh water.  

In her practice, Pamela Boyce Simms works with the United Nations, the Quaker-led Earthcare Coalition, and the Transition movement to build resilience networks. Creating Afrocentric food production solutions, she develops survival models for the world’s most vulnerable populations. 

More about Pamela Boyce Simms:

Hear the show streamed live Saturdays at 4:00 pm on WJFF Radio Catskill.  Subscribe to our podcast and listen to past shows onSoundCloud.

Tags: Climate change, United Nations, Quakers, Earthcare, Transition movement, Pamela Boyce Simms, environment, food, water, WJFF